Ginger root tea is what I like to think of as an all-rounder. It’s just one of those things that works all year round – iced in the summer and hot in the winter.

I wrote all about the health benefits of ginger in my last post. Check it out if you want to know more about how ginger is so great for us! Having shared why consuming ginger is often a good idea, today I will share with you How To Make Ginger Root Tea with four of my favourite recipes.

These recipes are adjusted for using either a saucepan or a tea strainer pot. If you can’t use either, it’s fine to simply add the ingredients into the serving cup along with the boiled water (actually, I often do this myself).

These easy-to-follow recipes yield 1 Litre of tea each. (Approx. 4 Servings)

(Note: using filtered water is best, but otherwise boiled water works well too)

 

Recipe 1 – Classic Ginger and Lemon

When making ginger tea, this variation is by far the most common. It’s light, refreshing, and easy-to-make. Not only that, but it’s versatile!

Simply, I couldn’t make a “How To Make Ginger Root Tea” recipe list without this here!

Since it’s so simple, it’s great for a wake up in the morning, for relaxing in the evening, and even on a hot summer’s day with some added ice.

15 MIN RECIPE

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Ingredients

Fresh Ginger Root
1.5 to 2 inch cube

Fresh Lemon
2 slices

Water
1 Litre

 

Directions

  1. Finely dice or grate the ginger and add to tea strainer pot or saucepan.
  2. Boil the water in a kettle if using a tea strainer, or boil it with the ginger in the saucepan.Either:
  3. Add water into the tea strainer pot and brew for at least 10 min.
  4. Alternatively, boil the ginger in the saucepan for 10 min.Then:
  5. Pour into serving cups.
  6. Squeeze the lemon into the cup and add to the infusion. Include the skin of the lemon.
  7. Brew still for 2 min, serve (or chill first), and enjoy! πŸ™‚

I’ve read this also works well with fresh mint, but have yet to try it. Let me know if you have! It certainly seems like it’s worth a try!

Lemon water and lemon tea has been a popular trend amongst the online health community for over a couple of years now. By encouraging people to drink lemon water and lemon tea, naturally people increased their fluid intake and therefore hydration.

Hydration is vital to good health and is required to function properly.

Other added benefits of lemon in this recipe may include a slight vitamin C and antioxidant boost and also helping with digestion. Plus, you definitely won’t need to worry about not having fresh breath!

Recipe 2 – Indian-inspired Herbal Ginger

I can admit that this one is an acquired taste. But for those of you that like Indian spices and a little experiment, this Indian-inspired herbal tea is definitely worth it!

Personally I very much enjoy this, and I think it’s great for adding a little kick to light and simple dishes such as vegetable basmati rice!

This tea naturally pairs well with healthy Indian dishes such as these, too!

15 MIN RECIPE

Ingredients

Fresh Ginger Root
1.5 to 2 inch cube

Cumin Seeds (or Powder)
Β½ tsp

Cinammon powder
Β½ tsp

Cardamom Pods
2 pods

Fennel Seeds
1 tsp

Water or milk
1 Litre

 

Directions

  1. Finely dice or grate the ginger and add to tea strainer pot or saucepan.
  2. Lightly crush the cardamom pods and add.
  3. Add the cumin and fennel.
  4. Boil the water / milk in a kettle if using a tea strainer, or boil it with the herbs and spices in the saucepan.Either:
  5. Add water / milk into the tea strainer pot and brew for at least 10 min.
  6. Alternatively, boil the herbs and spices in the saucepan for 10 min.Then:
  7. Pour into serving cups.
  8. Serve hot and enjoy! πŸ™‚

With this recipe feel free to omit or switch up some ingredients according to taste, of course! Other deliciously healthy ingredients include turmeric root or powder, black pepper, and anise!

The great thing about this recipe is that it’s more of an outline for you all to go and create something fun and personal! Share with everyone your favourite way to brew an Indian-inspired ginger tea!

Recipe 3 – Flu-fighting Ginger and Garlic

This herbal tea works great as a springtime remedy. When our immune systems are particularly vulnerable, it can help to give a little boost. Ginger and garlic are both brilliant herbs for combating the symptoms of colds and even fighting flue-like viruses!

This is best enjoyed when hot and is also a digestive stimulant1, so it’s great for after you’ve enjoyed a meal!

15 MIN RECIPE

Ingredients

  • Fresh Ginger Root – 1.5 to 2 inch cube (finely diced)
  • Fresh Garlic Cloves – 2 to 3 cloves (finely diced or crushed)
  • Water – 1 Litre

 

Directions

  1. Finely dice or grate the ginger and add to tea strainer pot or saucepan.
  2. Crush the garlic cloves and add in with the ginger.
  3. Boil the water in a kettle if using a tea strainer, or boil it with the herbs in the saucepan.
    Either:
  4. Add water into the tea strainer pot and brew for at least 10 min.
  5. Alternatively, boil the ginger in the saucepan for 10 min.
    Then:
  6. Pour into serving cups.
  7. Serve, and enjoy! πŸ™‚

 

I love to drink both garlic and ginger infusions as springtime tonics, and combining them gives you the best of both worlds!

Enjoy this outside in the sun with a book in hand, and embrance the onset of summer! (… Or just enjoy it any way)

 

Recipe 4 – Digestion-Boosting Ginger and Peppermint

This herbal tea works great as a springtime remedy. When our immune systems are particularly vulnerable, it can help to give a little boost. Ginger and garlic are both brilliant herbs for combating the symptoms of colds and even fighting flue-like viruses!

This is best enjoyed when hot and is also a digestive stimulant1, so it’s great for after you’ve enjoyed a meal!

15 MIN RECIPE

Ingredients

  • Fresh Ginger Root – 1.5 to 2 inch cube (finely diced)
  • Dried Peppermint Leaves / Peppermint Teabag – 1tsp / 1
  • Water – 1 Litre

 

Directions

  1. Finely dice or grate the ginger and add to tea strainer pot or saucepan.
  2. Add in your Peppermint.
  3. Boil the water in a kettle if using a tea strainer, or boil it with the herbs in the saucepan.
    Either:
  4. Add water into the tea strainer pot and brew for at least 10 min.
  5. Alternatively, boil the ginger in the saucepan for 10 min.
    Then:
  6. Pour into serving cups.
  7. Serve, and enjoy! πŸ™‚

Without a doubt, this is one of my favourite drinks to make. Every morning, one of the first things I do is make a peppermint tea. It effectively vitalises me for the day and ensures healthy digestion (yup)!

My post about the health benefits of ginger root goes into detail about how brilliant it is for our digestive system! As it turns out, peppermint may be just as powerful in both similar and different ways.

Let Me Share Some Examples!

In the past if I have suffered from an upset stomach, above all I have found one of the best remedies to be peppermint tea. It’s genuinely surprising how effective it is!

Many people have found it to be an effective remedy for the symptoms of IBS.

One study supporting this2Β found that of 110 patients in a placebo-controlled group, 29 of those taking peppermint oil were pain free and 79% had less abdominal pain. Additionally, regular bowel habits increased in 83% of those taking peppermint, and there were multiple other benefits such as reduced bloating. Here is another study review3 which concluded peppermint oil as a safe and effective reliever for IBS symptoms and pain.

I addition, another study2Β found reduced nausea post-operation with the inhalation of peppermint oil.

It may even have antibacterial properties on harmful bacteria found in the gut3. These are those such as helicobacter pylori (which causes gastric/stomach ulcers) and others. This is only based on in vitro studies, however, so more research is needed.

The great thing about this is, that the leaves are full of phenolic compounds, antioxidants, and essential oils. These include menthol and menthone – which would explain its distinct flavour, too!

If you suffer from gallstones, hiatal hernia, diabetes, heartburn, or acid reflux, speak to a qualified medical professional before using peppermint.

Let Me Know What YOU Think!

So, to end my post about how to make ginger root tea, I ask you to let me know your impressions of these recipes and how you most like to enjoy this versatile beverage!

If you try ginger root tea out, I hope you love these recipes as much as I do πŸ™‚

Also, please check out my recent post on the health benefits of ginger.

This wonderful ingredient is a herbal root has been used for thousands of years both medicinally and as a dietary addition, and it’s no wonder with its unique taste and valuable health benefits.

Anyway, that’s all for this post. Coming up soon will be a food list (hint: some food for thought), so keep an eye out πŸ™‚

Until the next one, stay healthy

James


References:

1 A review of the gastroprotective effects of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe). Haniadka R, Saldanha E, Sunita V, Palatty PL, Fayad R, Baliga MS.

2 Peppermint and the gut AVNI SALI MBBS, PhD, FACS, FRACS, FACNEM LUIS VITETTA PhD, GradDip, IntgrMed, GradDip, Nutr/EnvironMed

3 Alammar N, Wang L, Saberi B, et al. The impact of peppermint oil on the irritable bowel syndrome: a meta-analysis of the pooled clinical data. BMC Complement Altern Med. 2019;19(1):21. Published 2019 Jan 17. doi:10.1186/s12906-018-2409-0


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