Best Oatmeal Recipes For Breakfast - Nutritious and Beneficial

There’s nothing better than a hearty and wholesome breakfast. Full stop. These 5 best oatmeal recipes for breakfast are some of my favourite.

In this article, I would like to explore even further by sharing with you all some of my favourite recipes to kickstart the day ahead. From high-protein and savoury, to sweet (and sour*), each of the 5 recipes ahead contains a variety of easy and simple ingredients that you can make yourself at home or find in the supermarket. I’ll be explaining why each one is healthy, and you can decide for yourself which you like the most.

If you read my last post, you’ll know plenty about the benefits of getting your daily oats in and the best possible way that we can enjoy them – fermented! Maybe it sounds odd, but trust me, you HAVE TO try it (it’s awesome)!

(*If using fermented oats – which by the way, you can eat without heating if preferred)

I hope you enjoy 🙂

Recipe 1 – The Protein Pack

Best Oatmeal Recipes For Breakfast # 1

Prep time: 10 minutes

Ingredients:

  • Whole or steel-cut oats (preferably soaked or fermented) – 1 cup
  • Whole-fat Milk (or non-dairy substitute) – ½ or 2 cups
  • Eggs – 1 or 2
  • Chia Seeds – 1 tbsp
  • A pinch of salt and pepper

Method:

  1. If using soaked or fermented oats, make sure to drain them first, then add ½ cup of milk per 1 cup of oats. Otherwise simply use a 2:1 ratio of milk to oats. Set aside.
  2. Rinse the eggs and pat dry. We are going to be boiling these, so using a thin skewer, carefully poke a small hole in the bottom of the egg at the larger side. This will prevent cracking.
  3. In a saucepan, boil the water.
  4. Add the eggs and boil the on high heat 1 minute.
  5. Turn the heat off and cover the saucepan. Leave for 6 minutes, and follow the next steps in the meantime.
  6. Microwave your oats for 2 – 3 minutes on full heat for soaked or fermented oats, or 5 – 6 minutes for raw. Alternatively, use the stovetop, stirring constantly until the desired texture is reached and add to the serving bowl.
  7. After the eggs have cooked for 6 minutes, pour the water out of the pan (keeping the eggs in using any necessary tool) and replace with cold water.
  8. At this point you can add your chia seeds and salt.
  9. Finally, carefully tap around the eggs with the back of the spoon the lightly to crack the shell, and peel.
  10. Add your eggs to the oats and voila! A creamy, yolky, and hearty breakfast in 10 minutes!

Extra tip:

Soak the chia seeds ideally for 12 hours to create a gel. This makes the nutrients in the seeds more bioavailable and adds a nicer texture.

This one not only packs a punch of protein, but also makes use of many minerals (Wha- yeah? Too much alliteration? Ah okay, I’ll stop…)

Its protein content comes primarily from eggs which makes this a savoury recipe, and if you decide to use dairy milk this will be boosted. Furthermore, oats themselves are a fair protein source with an average of around a 14% content. Aside from the other amazing benefits of oats (as covered in my last post) – which are plentiful, thereis much loved about this recipe!

High-protein:

The main ingredients in this all contribute to protein intake. Oats and chia seeds both consist of about 14% protein by weight. Also, on average, one large egg will contain 6-7 grams of protein, and if using pastured (/ free-range in UK) eggs this could be even higher. Don’t forget milk either! For those that often excercise at least on a moderate level this will help you recover more efficiently and could improve performance. Furthermore, high-protein diets improve bone density. For those looking to lose weight this is great too, as eggs will increase satiety and curb hunger.


Immune and nervous systems:

Eggs contain a fair selenium content which is essential for a healthy immune system. The vitamin A (and related zeaxanthin and lutein) content of eggs is also beneficial here, as they support the immune system and nervous system (particularly eye health). Not only this, but they contain amounts of nearly every mineral and vitamin that we require! Another contributing factor is the chia seeds which are rich in antioxidants. Needless to say, this recipe is also highly anti-inflammatory! The beneficial effects of beta-glucans also support the immune system, and these healthy fibres are naturally present in oats!

Heart Healthy:

Oats contain a high amount of fibre – specifically beta-glucan. This soluble fibre is extremely healthy for the heart (and much else). It reduces LDL cholesterol levels, lowers insulin response, and reduces blood sugar.  Next, we’ll talk about eggs. It’s a common misconception that eggs are bad for our hearts. This is due to multiple misunderstandings and myths promoted by the modern medical system as bad by those who have been told it. Fortunately, more and more people are realising the truth about nutrition and health today. Eggs not only raise HDL cholesterol levels (which is good for us), it makes the particles of some LDL cholesterol (which can be potentially harmful) larger. This allows them to function efficiently rather than causing damage. Chia seeds also may benefit heart health due to their high fibre and omega-3 levels.

Brain Boosting:

Choline found in eggs is excellent for the brain, as are protein and the omega-3s found in chia seeds! In particular, choline is essential for aiding in brain development, memory, and mental health!

Recipe 2 – Chocolate Crunch

Best Oatmeal Recipes For Breakfast # 2

Prep time: 3-6 minutes

Ingredients:

  • Whole or steel-cut oats (preferably soaked or fermented) – 1 cup
  • Whole-fat Milk (or non-dairy substitute) – ½ cup for soaked/fermented or 2 cups for raw
  • 2-4 squares of your favourite dark (80% +) low-sugar chocolate bar (I prefer Green & Blacks)
  • Nuts of your choice (best soaked, sprouted, or fermented) – 1 handful
  • A pinch of salt and pepper

Method:

  1. If using soaked or
    fermented oats, make sure to drain them first, then add ½ cup of milk
    per 1 cup of oats. Otherwise simply use a 2:1 ratio of milk to oats.
  2. Microwave your oats for 2 – 3 minutes on full heat for soaked or fermented oats, or 5 – 6 minutes for raw. Alternatively, use the stovetop, stirring constantly until the desired texture is reached and add to the serving bowl.
  3. Add your chocolate to melt (stir).
  4. Add the nuts.
  5. Season with salt and pepper.
  6. ENJOY!

I actually had this yesterday (minus the salt and pepper)! It works amazingly with brazil nuts 🙂

Nuts:

Nuts are extremely nutritious and anti-inflammatory, and are valuable sources of plant protein and fat. The benefits of each nut differ, of course, but one thing they all have in common is their high mineral content. The most common minerals present in nuts are selenium, magnesium, copper, manganese, and more. These are all vital for the body to function healthily in many ways. Nuts also are abundant in antioxidants and fibre, which makes them brilliant for the immune system and heart health, and for reducing the risk of many diseases.

Now onto the exciting part for most – chocolate! Whilst it is no lie that the sugar-packed abominations sold in the high street are worse for health than many of us actually know, chocolate bars can be healthy.

When you can get one low in sugar (preferably below 10%) and high in cocoa (or cacao) and without artificial sweeteners, it won’t have to be cheat food per se. Of course, one without any added sugar is better, but finding them can be hard and making them even more so (but worth it). Instead, opt for the best one that you can find. As you eat a more natural diet, your tastebuds will detect natural sweetness in the chocolate anyway. The benefits of cocoa are vast and far-reaching, so here we will summarise some of the most notable: its flavonoids can greatly strengthen the cardiovascular system brain health – which is undoubtedly the reason that is known to promote a good mood! It also modulates blood sugar levels, and can increase HDL cholesterol whilst lowering LDL.

Recipe 3 – Avocad-oats

Best Oatmeal Recipes For Breakfast #3

Prep time: 3-6 minutes

Ingredients:

  • Whole or steel-cut oats (preferably soaked or fermented) – 1 cup
  • Whole-fat Milk (or non-dairy substitute) – ½ cup for soaked/fermented or 2 cups for raw
  • Avocado – ½ in 2 quarters or 1 in 4
  • Full-fat Probiotic Yoghurt or Kefir – 1 to 2 tbsp

Method:

  1. If using soaked or
    fermented oats, make sure to drain them first, then add ½ cup of milk
    per 1 cup of oats. Otherwise simply use a 2:1 ratio of milk to oats.
  2. Microwave
    your oats for 2 – 3 minutes on full heat for soaked or fermented oats,
    or 5 – 6 minutes for raw. Alternatively, use the stovetop, stirring
    constantly until the desired texture is reached and add to the serving
    bowl.
  3. Using a sharp straight knife, slice the avocado in half lengthwise around the pit. Then slice each half into quarters horizontally around the pit to create 4 similar pieces. Peel each piece and discard the skin and pit (or keep for growing!).
  4. Add the desired amount of pieces of avocado into the oats.
  5. Add your extra probiotics.
  6. Dig in! You can use your spoon to slice the avocado into pieces in the bowl.

This recipe is the creamiest on this list and works greatly on a summer’s day when avocados are in their most optimum season for harvest. It’s simple and yet flavoursome and wholesome.

Benefits of Avocado:

Avocado is consumed extensively for its health properties, and has found itself in the spotlight of many trying to follow a healthy and nutritious diet. Just like all of the other recipes in this list, avocado is rich in fibre, which is great for gut and heart health, weight loss, and blood sugar. Additionally, it is a wonderful source of monosaturated fats (the same kind found in olive oil, specifically oleic acid omega-9 – making avocado and its oil also safe for cooking). In terms of its nutrients, here is some data about (california) hass avocado as per one average avocado (roughly 150 grams):

Avocado Nutrition Label - Best Oatmeal Recipes For Breakfast

There is one correction I would like to make here: Most sources would agree that on average an avocado of this variety do actually contain 2 to 4% of the average RDA of vitamin A for an adult. Furthermore, a little note I would like to make is that avocados can increase vitamin A absorption by up to 4 times, so having it too often with vitamin A retinol sources (first found in animal products) is inadvisable, but this isn’t a concern for most.

Adding yoghurt or kefir will boost the calcium content as well as that of potassium, protein, and healthy fats. Another notable benefit is of course its supportive effect on gut health and the microbiome due to its probiotic properties and bacteria. This is essential for maintaining a healthy digestive system and brain health, and much more including stimulating and strengthening the immune system.

Recipe 4 – Fun and Fruity

Best Oatmeal Recipes For Breakfast #4

Prep time: 3-6 minutes

Ingredients:

  • Whole or steel-cut oats (preferably soaked or fermented) – 1 cup
  • Whole-fat Milk (or non-dairy substitute) – ½ cup for soaked/fermented or 2 cups for raw
  • Kiwi – 1 fruit
  • Berries of your choice – 1 handful
  • Freshly squeezed lemon or lime juice (optional) – to taste

Method:

  1. If using soaked or
    fermented oats, make sure to drain them first, then add ½ cup of milk
    per 1 cup of oats. Otherwise simply use a 2:1 ratio of milk to oats.
  2. Microwave
    your oats for 2 – 3 minutes on full heat for soaked or fermented oats,
    or 5 – 6 minutes for raw. Alternatively, use the stovetop, stirring
    constantly until the desired texture is reached and add to the serving
    bowl.
  3. Using a sharp straight knife, slice the kiwi in half. Slice each half into quarters. Slice each quarter into 4 straight pieces. Add to oats.
  4. Add the berries.
  5. Season lemon or lime juice.

Kiwis:

These are very high in vitamin C which is great for immune system and is essential for building tissue, cartilage, and collagen within the body. They have over 100% of the recommended RDA per fruit on average.

The add to this, the small berries such as blueberries and raspberries are also very high in vitamin C (in fact, kiwis are technically a berry). They are also highly anti-inflammatory due to their antioxidants levels, have demonstrated anti-cancer properties and have been shown to support healthy brain function in multiple ways. Now isn’t that impressive for such a small creation of nature?

For an extra hint of flavour, or an alternative to lemon / lime juice, adding a little orange zest isn’t a bad idea!

Recipe 5 – Classic-inspired Savoury Porridge

Best Oatmeal Recipes For Breakfast # 5

Prep time: 8 minutes

Ingredients:

  • Whole or steel-cut oats (preferably soaked or fermented) – 1 cup
  • Whole-fat Milk (or non-dairy substitute) – ½ cup for soaked/fermented or 2 cups for raw
  • Eggs – 1 to 2
  • Yeast Extract (Marmite) – 1 teaspoon
  • Virgin Coconut Oil – 1 teaspoon or tablespoon (preference)
  • A pinch of salt and pepper. (Black Himalayan rock salt works best)

Method:

  1. If using soaked or fermented oats, make sure to drain them first, then add ½ cup of milk per 1 cup of oats. Otherwise simply use a 2:1 ratio of milk to oats. Set aside.
  2. Rinse the eggs and pat dry. Once again, carefully poke a small hole in the bottom of the egg at the larger side using a thin skewer. This will prevent cracking.
  3. In a saucepan, boil the water.
  4. Add the eggs and boil the on high heat 1 minute.
  5. Turn the heat off and cover the saucepan. Leave for 6 minutes, and follow the next steps in the meantime.
  6. Microwave your oats for 2 – 3 minutes on full heat for soaked or fermented oats, or 5 – 6 minutes for raw. Alternatively, use the stovetop, stirring constantly until the desired texture is reached and add to the serving bowl.
  7. Stir in your yeast extract and coconut oil, making sure to mix them in well!
  8. When the eggs have cooked for 6 minutes, pour the water out of the pan (keeping the eggs in using any necessary tool) and replace with cold water. Alternatively you can place your eggs in ice water. Let them cool quickly.
  9. Finally, carefully tap around the eggs with the back of the spoon the lightly to crack the shell, and peel.
  10. Split open your egg, and let the yolk into your oats!
  11. Dig in!

Yeast Extract:

Despite being a bit of a love it or hate it food, yeast extract has some impressive benefits! First and foremost, it is an excellent source of protein – and complete protein at that! They provide 18 amino acids, comprising over 50% of this delicious spread’s content!

Additionally, it can provide six different B-vitamins, which are important for the immune system, proper growth, organ health, and metabolism. Oftentimes you will find these vitamins added in, boosting the amounts.

Beneficial minerals also found in yeast extract include selenium, magnesium, manganese, zinc, chromium, and phosphorus!

One study has even found that it may be beneficial in improving chronic fatigue, stimulating the immune system, and reducing inflammation! How’s that for a side product of fermentation!

About the recipe! It’s worth a try…

This recipe is a recent of mine that I thought I’d come and add here!

I have to admit, when I first tried yeast extract without I was a little unsure. However, I quickly found that it works more than well and pairs excellently with other classic breakfast foods.

It is high in protein and has all of the benefits of eggs discussed recipe 1! Since writing this I’ve also published an article on the healthiest foods for longevity. If you want to know more about eggs, it’s a great place to have a look (they’re the final item)!

I’m sure you’ll enjoy this recipe, and please comment below if you try it. It’s definitely worth a taste and is a healthy, easy, and even classic breakfast… Or at least I think so!

So, what have we learned here? Well, apart from how to make an awesome breakfast 😉

I hope you have learnt at least a little about the benefits of oats, and as I said before you can always check out my last post for more information.
We also discussed eggs in a fair amount of detail, and I’m sure some of you would have been surprised to read that they don’t actually raise our bad cholesterol levels! Trust me, they’re worth including in your diet (mostly if you can get pastured/free-range)… unless you have any intolerence. Everyone is different after all, so it’s important to eat what is best for you specifically.

Also, we covered some helpful nutrition facts about nuts, avocados, chocolate, probiotics such as yoghurt, and fruits such as kiwis and berries, and the tremendous benefits that each of these can have! See that list? Being healthy is fun (and easy)! And we’re only getting started in this post of the ‘Best Oatmeal Recipes For Breakfast’. So if you enjoyed this, maybe you would enjoy my other posts. Stick around for more 🙂

Thank you everyone for reading, let me know what you thought and if you have any feedback please do share! Did you like these recipes? How do you usually have your oats?

Until the next one, stay healthy

James

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